What Saves My Sanity as an Introverted Stay-At-Home Mom

posted by Andrea | 04/27/2017
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Although I would never describe myself as a “full-blown introvert” Dave and I both have many introverted tendencies, and usually fall right on the border between “I” and “E” on the Myers Briggs tests.

Fun Fact: I’ve taken the Myers Briggs test SO many times for various high school, college, career, and personal reasons.  Before I was married, I almost always scored as an “ESTJ”. After getting married, my scores have almost always been “ISTJ” 🙂

Also, if you’ve never taken a test like this before, here’s a quick free option. And here’s a great book specifically using your personality type to discover your parenting strengths.

I’ve never been a “touchy” person (I need my space people) and I don’t particularly love small talk (just get to the point and move on). I am often the first one to leave a party even when I’m having a really good time, and I’ve ALWAYS been one to go to bed on time (my parents never even gave me a curfew!)

I love people, I can easily interact with all sorts of different people… but I need my own space and some alone time too.

In fact, I’d say Dave is the ONLY person I can be around 24/7 without feeling like I’m going to explode from “too much”… too much noise, too much pointless conversation, too much togetherness, too much closeness, too many questions, too many smells, too many hugs.

I’m sure Dave knows how lucky he is! 

As you can imagine, my induction into motherhood was sort of a challenge for me — especially due to the fact that Nora had sensory issues and basically needed ME all the time.

Not only did she scream and cry for the majority of her waking hours (and you know how little she slept — so that was a lot of crying), she was basically glued to my body for roughly 23 hours of the day, insisting on sleeping ON me, refusing all babysitters, refusing bottles, and basically being miserable whenever she wasn’t touching some part of my body.

Although I loved that needy little girl fiercely, I was desperate for my own space and my own time. 

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Thankfully, a few years and a few babies later, I have nearly perfected the art of staying at home with multiple little people without feeling like I’m going to go insane if they touch me for the 387th time, sing the same song for the 38th time, or make a ridiculous amount of noise for absolutely no reason at all.

Yes, I can be an introverted stay-at-home mom and enjoy it!

If you are also an introverted stay-at-home-parent struggling to make it through your very loud, very touchy, very people-centric days, here are a few of the things that have helped me over the years!

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1. We put our children to bed very early.

I just talked about our kids’ bedtime routine last week… but this is #1 on my list because I honestly think it’s the most sanity-saving thing I do every single day.

All 3 kids are almost always in bed by 7:00pm, sometimes 6:45pm, depending on how tired they are… and you know what? Our kids don’t suffer in the least!

They almost never put up any fuss when it’s time for bed, they fall asleep quickly, they sleep well all night long, and they wake up relatively early in good moods.

Meanwhile, Dave and I get 3-4 hours of kid-free time every single night to work on blog posts, grade papers, watch a show on Netflix, work on house and yard projects, run errands, or whatever else we want/need to do.

We rest, we relax, we re-charge… without this time, I would most likely be a stressed-out, unhappy, basket-case (like I was for the first 2 years of Nora’s life).

2. I use the TV to buy me a little free time.

I know there are different opinions on kids and screen time — but I will never feel bad for sharing the fact that our children watch some TV every single day. And no, I don’t necessarily use it for educational purposes, I use it as a babysitter to buy me a little free time when I feel like I might have a nervous breakdown if someone touches my face, pulls my earrings, pulls on my clothing, or sneezes on me one more time.

Since we don’t have cable anymore, we only watch shows on Netflix, Hoopla, PBS kids, and Disney Jr — which means no commercials and I can pick and choose what types of shows I allow them to watch.

During their TV time, I sometimes pick up the house, sometimes cook or bake in peace, sometimes respond to emails, and sometimes just sit on the couch and read or close my eyes for a few minutes.

Also, for anyone who is worried about my children’s well-being with all this TV watching, I should point out that they have never used a computer or smartphone, they think the iPad is only for doing FaceTime with my sister, they don’t even know what Nintendo or Wii are, and they really have no other access to technology in their life.

They will be fine… I promise!

3. I try hard to foster early independence.

Although I don’t think my children need to “grow up quickly”, I DO think there are many benefits in fostering early independence (especially for the mom who otherwise has to do EVERYTHING for EVERYONE)!

Nora can easily get dressed, make her bed, put her pjs away, go to the bathroom, brush her hair, and do her own ponytail without so much as one thing needed from me. She can reach all her clothing thanks to a conveniently placed step stool, she can access everything she needs to “get ready” each day, and she is even becoming quite competent in the kitchen — getting snacks for people, refilling her water, cleaning out the dishwasher, setting the table, etc.

Simon can usually get dressed on his own (depending on his pants selections) and always does his own coat and shoes. Thanks to our favorite booster chairs, he can easily climb up to the table on his own, put his own bib on (he insists on wearing a bib), and get his own water from the spout on the fridge. He still needs help wiping himself after going to the bathroom, but he can wash his own hands … and he loves being “helpful” by getting things James can’t reach yet! He can also buckle himself into his car seat (all I have to do is tighten the straps).

James can get his shoes and coat off (not on yet) and he can climb into the van and get up into his carseat all by himself. He can wash his hands on his own (thanks to this automatic soap pump), he knows where we keep his pacifier, his water cup, and his blanket, and he is very good at following directions — especially when his siblings “help” him.

I realize this might not sound like much — but my people are becoming SO independent — which means there are SO many fewer things I need to do every minute of every day.

All 3 of them play outside fairly nicely, even if I’m in a different part of the yard weeding. They will also play upstairs for a while when I’m making dinner or answering emails.

Of course, I am still very much in demand around our house… but the increased independence is glorious!

4. I make it fun to stay home.

I do NOT like getting out and about with 3 little kids… even for fun activities. We will participate in free events at our local library and local early childhood center because they are walking distance from our house, but that’s about it.

There are weeks when we literally never leave our house except to bring Nora to school, to get groceries, and to go to church — and you know what, I don’t think anyone feels confined, bored, or restless.

In fact, the last time I took the kids out for a morning (I don’t even remember where we went) Simon asked “are we going home now? I really like it when we go home.”

I couldn’t help but smile because I feel the exact same way!

We have a huge yard and a huge driveway to play in, we also have several play spaces insides our house — the play area at the top of the stairs where all our kitchen things are, our new playroom complete with a maze of roads, dress-up closet and baby corner, Nora’s “school room” under the stairs, etc. etc.  Plus, the kids have a few toys in their bedrooms, too.

I also try to invite people over to our house at least once a week — sometimes more. We’ll invite friends or neighbors over or have grandparents over for dinner because I’d MUCH rather host than go to someone else’s home!

5. I get outside as much as possible.

As I mentioned above, we are outside a lot — and even though I’m still there watching them, everything seems calmer and quieter when we’re outside versus inside.

Plus, as the kids get older and more capable of being outside without constant supervision, I can actually do my own thing for a bit. Often, I’ll sit in a lawnchair and read a book on my phone or do some yard work in solitude, while still keeping an eye and ear on my kids.

We also live in a great location for walking to so many destinations — and when we walk, we are often fairly quiet. The kids talk with each other, point out big trucks and police cars, ask a few questions every now and then, and sometimes even fall asleep. Meanwhile, I’m free to think my own thoughts while enjoying fresh air, a little exercise, and crossing something off my to-do list as we often walk to the bank, the library, the grocery store, etc.

6. I don’t feel bad not doing something.

I wasn’t really sure how explain this one… basically, if someone asks us to do something that I don’t want to do, I say ‘no thanks’ even if it might be fun.

I know, this makes me sound completely unfun and horrible — but I promise it’s not as bad as it sounds. My kids and I do LOTS of fun things, but I also turn down opportunities to do lots of fun things as well — especially if they are during nap time, later in the afternoon when Dave is usually home, or if they involve a long drive (my kids hate being in the car just as much as I do).

I used to feel bad saying ‘no’ and I’d often say ‘yes’ out of obligation — but then I’d feel stressed out and my kids often whined and asked to go home the entire time. I decided to trust my gut instinct and stop feeling bad if we decided not do something, even if lots of others were doing it and having a great time. My children are young enough that they don’t know what they are missing, and they have plenty of fun things to occupy their time right here at our home!

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Of course, there are still daily struggles, times when I force myself (or am forced) to get out of my comfort zone, and nights when I feel like I could easily go to bed at 8:30pm. I think most parents have these types of days though!

The important thing for me is that I can enjoy being home with my loud, messy, crazy, touchy children all day, everyday without feeling like I need to lock myself in the bathroom until Dave gets home from school.

And speaking of Dave getting home from school — that’s another huge sanity saver for me. He is almost always home around 3:30pm — which means I have at least an hour to re-group and decompress before we eat dinner (yes, we eat really early).

I know most stay-at-home parents aren’t as fortunate and I am very grateful he can be home so early on a regular basis!

Are you an introverted stay-at-home parent?

If so, I’d love to hear your tips and tricks to make it through the days!

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44 comments

  1. Lamora

    05/16/2017

    I am a highly sensitive person and am a stay at home mom to 3, and I was nodding my head while reading this entire post. I love it. I do the exact same things to cope and give myself air to breathe. If not, I just feel like running away! Thanks for sharing, I don’t feel so weird now. :p

    [Reply]

    Andrea Reply:

    yay — glad you don’t feel so weird now 🙂

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  2. Brenda

    05/06/2017

    I loved this post. So many times I feel like we are swimming upstream awkwardly, because we just don’t seem to thrive doing a lot outside the home. What you wrote encouraged me and empowered me to not second guess myself or feel guilty about saying no. Thank you for writing! I read all of your posts. Living an organized life doesn’t come natural for me, so tjings that just come second nature to you or seem like common sense are huge building blocks for me.

    [Reply]

    Andrea Reply:

    Thanks Brenda! Never feel guilty for saying no 🙂

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  3. Alicia

    04/29/2017

    This is exactly me! Maybe that’s why I love your blog so much, Andrea, because I’m very much an introvert and can relate to so much of what you write about, in pretty much every way!!

    I do ALL of these things you mentioned as well! Yay – I’m not weird! I used to think there was something wrong with me for being so different than many of my friends and family members.

    I’ve always been an introvert. Many people think that means we are socially awkward. But that’s not the case at all for me, actually. I deal very well with people and most people who don’t know me well probably think I’m an extrovert (although that didn’t always used to be the case. I was very shy as a child/teenager). I prefer staying home and will a lot of times…I don’t want to say “avoid” social situations, but if they don’t fit in perfectly with our already in place schedule, we will definitely pass. And I don’t feel bad about it either!

    What’s hilarious though is my husband is most definitely an extrovert . He totally thrives in social situations and LOVES having people over/going to other’s houses whereas I do not AT ALL. Lol. In our case at least, opposites definitely attract!

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  4. Annaleah

    04/28/2017

    As an introverted, stay-at-home homeschooling mom to six ages 8 and under, my biggest sanity saver is our daily “rest time”. Most of my kids don’t nap anymore, but we have a rest time where everyone is required to sit quietly and do quiet activities for an hour and a half. It doesn’t always go perfectly, but it gives me time to rest, recharge, get something done, or do something I think is fun. Definitely helps me get through the rest of the day. I plan on continuing this even when my kids are teenagers!

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  5. Joy

    04/27/2017

    LOVE IT!!!
    This was so refreshing to hear a mom that says it’s ok if you don’t approve. This is our lives and we, honestly, are ok. More than ok.
    A happy and content mama is a must.
    You’ve clearly found a balance where you’re not sacrificing every little thing just because you’re a mom. But at the same time, you aren’t so self centered where the kids eat hotdogs out of the fridge because you’re sipping mimosas and watching Ellen.
    You’re a mom. And you love your family enough to show them balance.
    Love it!!!

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    Jennifer Reply:

    Joy, thanks for that comment! I often feel guilty and selfish because I want a little time to myself, but you are so right. I’m not drinking mimosas or watching Ellen, or anything else like that. I just want to breath slowly in a quiet place for 5 freaking minutes or read a chapter or get something done. And by golly, my son can handle 30-60 min playing on an iPad or watching tv. Too much screen time is a relevant issue. I’m an INFP and watching tv is sometimes the only thing that gets me out of my head.

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    Joy Reply:

    Jennifer,
    I get you completely. It’s called Ketchup and mustard times. When things are crazy, its mustard days. But when things slow down, that’s your (Ketchup) catch-up time. Time for you to catch up on you time. SO, let it all balance out into catchup and mustard….;)

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  6. Marsha

    04/27/2017

    Hi,
    I’ve been reading your blog since the first, under the old name. I never comment but I totally agree with your running of your household. I think your a great mom. I have a 15 year old son who has autism. I also need alone time for my sanity. He’s very high functioning, but also has the sensitivity issues Nora had. His hasn’t gone away. He goes to bed at 8pm. Everyone thinks we’re nuts, but he needs the sleep and we need some alone time. Keep up the good work.

    [Reply]

    Andrea Reply:

    Thanks for the encouragement Marsha!!
    I’m glad you get some peace and quiet every night too — good for you!

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  7. Danielle

    04/27/2017

    I find when I stay too many days at home my middle two kids (4 yrs and 2yrs) start fighting more. Do your kiddos fight much?

    [Reply]

    Andrea Reply:

    My kids fight like any “normal” siblings would (at least in my opinion) but we get outside quite a bit. I find that we the weather is bad and we’re inside too many days, THEN they fight — but we don’t necessarily need to leave and go to a different location. However, I have a feeling this would depend on your kids’ personality types as well.

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  8. Jana

    04/27/2017

    Your first few paragraphs made me smile. They describe me as well! Used to be an ESTJ, now an ISTJ as I have grown older. My husband and boys love to be home as well, and even as high schoolers did not mind that they were “home alone” on a Friday night with their parents. They realize that they need to be away from people for a bit to recharge. My older son adjusted well to dorm life, and just learned to deal with the constant onslaught of people. I am sure younger son will adjust too, but they both still prefer some alone time now and again. I also used TV time as a chance for me to do something quietly. I was as eager as my son was for the “Little Bear” show to start. 🙂

    [Reply]

    Andrea Reply:

    haha yes! Before we had Netflix, I would honestly plan my day around Daniel Tiger at 11:00am. Then I got 30 minutes of time to regroup before lunch time!

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  9. Rebecca

    04/27/2017

    I love this post! I am different in the social aspect than you but what I love about this post is your straightforward way of doing what works for your family and sharing that with us. it works for you and gives the rest of us awesome practical ideas of things to try for our family in whatever stage we might be in. I had several high maintenance kids over the years and had to use tv to give myself a moment of peace most days! So thanks for sharing with us this post!

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  10. Katherine

    04/27/2017

    I don’t think that this is particularly tied to being an introvert…but maybe? This week I have silenced my phone during certain hours of the day, then turned it back on during the kids’ nap times and in the evening. I feel much calmer. Last week I just felt frantic a lot, even though it was a fairly normal week at home with the kids. I noticed that my mindless email/facebook/whatever checking was sort of out of control– which means I am taking in information all day long. It just led to unnecessary cluttered mind stuff- you know?

    Anyway. Some people thrive off of multitasking and doing this and that on the go. This week I am doing so much better just silencing that extra input via my iPhone. I have enough stimulation from my kids- just like you said, with the talking/singing/touching/etc all day long. I don’t need Facebook chiming in too.

    Does that make sense? It’s made a difference to me:)

    [Reply]

    Andrea Reply:

    yup, this makes total sense!

    [Reply]

  11. Ruth

    04/27/2017

    Wait…is that a thing to not like small talk? I never knew that! I always thought something was wrong with me but I can’t stand chit chat. It’s so boring. I love people and getting to know new people cause getting to know someone usually means deeper conversations but just hanging out with the same person over and over? No thanks!

    [Reply]

    Andrea Reply:

    haha — I don’t know if it’s a “thing” but I seriously detest small talk!

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    Jennifer Reply:

    I feel the exact same way. Like Andrea said though, with the exception of my husband. Probably because he’s not a chit-chat guy.

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  12. Shelly Smith

    04/27/2017

    I relate to you (and this post) on so many levels… I am also an introverted, SAHM, who really loves to be at home! When our boys were younger (they are now 14, 12, and 9) they also had very early bedtimes (sometimes as early as 6 pm!!) People thought we were crazy to put them to bed that early, but we learned (over time) that they would always wake up around 6 or 6:30 a.m., regardless of how early OR late they went to bed, so we gradually worked their bedtime earlier until we found that “sweet spot” which was often a 6 p.m. bedtime! Like you, I am blessed with a husband who gets home from work early (usually by 4), we all prefer an early dinner, and my hubby has always been an early riser, so he would take the early wake-up calls on the weekends, and give me a chance to sleep in occasionally! 🙂
    Now that our boys are older and involved in a swim club, they have evening practices and we have made big changes in our evening schedule, but as with everything in life, we ADJUST to the new stage and do what works for our family! Thankfully, because we home school AND our boys have (mostly) learned how to sleep in, their later bedtime (9:30 most nights) does not make them sleep deprived because they will *usually* sleep in, as needed! (One son, the most like his father, is still an early riser most days!) It’s neat to see how our schedules change as they grow and their needs (our needs?!) change too! Thanks for keeping it real and helping other Moms see that “normal” is just a setting on the dryer! 😉

    [Reply]

  13. Angela

    04/27/2017

    I’m curious. What is Dave’s personality type?

    [Reply]

    Andrea Reply:

    you know, I’m honestly not sure of the exact letters for his personality. He does waffle between introvert and extrovert and I have a feeling he would be exactly the opposite of me on a few of the other letters!

    [Reply]

    Andrea Reply:

    I just asked Dave — he’s ISFJ (where I’m ISTJ) The T/F difference is VERY obvious in our relationship — he’s so much more patient, calm, collected, etc. where I’m quick to just say what I think, more judgemental, and just want to be “done” so I can move onto the next thing 🙂
    Good thing we seem to balance eachother out pretty well — and we both have the “S” part, I think it would be hard for either of us if the other wasn’t an “S”

    [Reply]

  14. Karen

    04/27/2017

    Also a huge introvert, will take the test for fun in a minute. I homeschooled mine, so they were always around. I think there are other benefits for your kids in the way you do things, too. Your kids learn to socialize with people outside their peer group when you take them on errands – that’s an important life skill. We allowed one ongoing activity, like dance class at a time as well as unstructured play with other kids their age and it seemed to be enough. I seriously think the best opportunity for kids and parents whose calendar is less full is the chance to experience a little boredom. Teaching them how to cope with that was a lifesaver for me, and they ended up doing some surprising things. They owned their hobbies which bought me breathing space. One learned enough Japanese to understand Japanese newscasts regarding Fukoshima and does creative writing, another learned enough Russian to “eavesdrop” on two elderly ladies at a bus stop and does metal work. One thing they do not need is to be continually entertained. As now young adults, this serves them well in several ways.

    Your kids are going to be just fine, wonderful, self confident adults.

    [Reply]

  15. Lane

    04/27/2017

    Introverted SAHM here (INFP). When my first was a little, we went out almost every morning (story time, music class, you name it) and then came home for lunch and nap. Having a schedule made me feel less crazy and gave some much needed structure to the blur of days.

    When baby #2 came along, our schedule was much like yours – we really only left the house to drop-off/pick-up big sister from preschool. I felt guilty for doing as many classes and activities with my second, but like you said, she never really knew what she was missing and was perfectly happy. She loves to be home!

    Now that they’re both in school and have some much-needed quiet work time for a few hours each day. It’s taken me years, but I’m FINALLY getting better at saying ‘no thanks’ to ever invitation and volunteer request that comes my way. You’ve definitely helped me in that regard – thank you!

    [Reply]

    Andrea Reply:

    I keep telling Dave that when all the kids are in school full time (still at least 5-6 year away) our yard will be immaculate because I’ll spend so much time outside mowing, edging, pulling weeds, etc. — all in complete silence. It will be so enjoyable for me (and he is already looking forward to less mowing responsibility!)

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  16. Mandy

    04/27/2017

    Introvert SAH mom’s unite (alone and with no talking, of course :)). It really helps me if I relax during naptime instead of cleaning or trying to get other stuff done. I need that time to recharge! Also, my husband will take our son from after dinner until bedtime so I get 45 glorious minutes of alone time.

    [Reply]

    Andrea Reply:

    yes exactly! Alone, with no talking!

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  17. Elizabeth

    04/27/2017

    Love this post!!! Introverted stay-at-home mom here, too. You handle it all with so much grace, Andrea. I admire how you know what you need to do (or avoid), and you do it without wavering! Your posts like this one have been a really helpful support for me. As always, your blog is a consistent, long-time favorite! Thanks for what you do!

    [Reply]

    Andrea Reply:

    Thanks Elizabeth!
    I think the “without wavering” part is easier to show in writing than in real life. There are definitely still times when I think “am I doing it right” (Whatever “right” is) or “should we be doing more, better, bigger, different things?”
    But we are all happy — and that’s a lot more than I can say for a lo to families!

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  18. Kellie Denton

    04/27/2017

    I LOVED this post! I found myself saying “YES!” so many times to your points, especially the TV use. I also unapologetically use it as a babysitter and I’m pretty sure my spawn will turn out just fine. Thanks for keeping things real!

    [Reply]

    Andrea Reply:

    haha — you’re welcome Kellie 🙂

    [Reply]

  19. Julie

    04/27/2017

    I felt the same way. And did most of the same things too. Mine are now 15,15,16,9 and we still do lots of the same things you are doing now. My kids usually don’t want to go out now, but we homeschool and I make them for some of our classes. Of course now they are responsible for getting themselves ready so it is much easier. Growing up we always ate when my dad got home at 4:30 on the dot. Now my family eats at 4:30 when my husband gets home because he is starving by then. When the kids were little we would go out every day rain or shine and in the cold too. Sometimes for only a few minutes if it was too cold. Even now we are out EVERY day even when it is below zero…my kids just need that.

    [Reply]

    Andrea Reply:

    Yeah, we are all starving by 4:30pm — it just seems to be the perfect time for our family dinner (at least for right now). If we have to go somewhere and eat later, we’ll usually still just have a full meal at home and get dessert or a salad later. Everyone is crabby if we don’t fill our bellies early!

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  20. Mara Yager

    04/27/2017

    SUCH a great post thanks for sharing!!

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  21. Eileen

    04/27/2017

    Thank you so much for posting! I have a similar personality and don’t naturally think about all of the activities that we could be doing but aren’t since I am happy to spend a lot of time at home with our kids. I hear a lot/get questions about if we are signing up for dance..summer camp..gymnastics..art class..and sometimes start to feel like I am doing something wrong since we say no to many of those things. When we have been away from our house more often than usual, our kids seem overtired/cranky and our house is weirdly messier. Thank you again for the kind encouragement to do what works for your family!

    [Reply]

    Andrea Reply:

    yes, I don’t often think about all these “extra” things we could be doing either. It’s usually not until I realize how much stuff other people’s children do that I wonder if we should be doing more. But judging by some of our friend’s SUPER stressful and SUPER busy lifestyles, I’d say we’re doing OK just hanging out at home with our kids.

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  22. Jen

    04/27/2017

    I’m sure it won’t surprise you at all to know that I score EXACTLY the same on the Meyers-Briggs. HAHA (I’m right on borderline between ESTJ/ISTJ too!) And I was exactly the same way when our kids were little, except that I was one of those “freaky” moms, who had all my babies on a strict schedule (worked for me and my kids-not saying it’s for everyone) so that made staying home even more important. We said no to a lot to preserve our sanity and I don’t regret it at all.

    The important thing (as I know you know) is realizing what works for you and understanding it doesn’t have to work for anyone else. It never mattered to me what other people did but, boy, did I get a lot of criticism for the way my kids were on a schedule, making sure they had naps in their own beds, etc. One of my least favorite quotes is that one that says “my house is messy but my kids are loved” or something to that effect. I have four beautiful, much-loved, well-adjusted children (ages 24, 21, 19, and 17) and somehow they all managed to survive their neat and organized home, planned meals, and infant feeding schedules. HAHA As my daughter would say “You do YOU and don’t worry about everyone else!” Happy Thursday!

    [Reply]

    Andrea Reply:

    nope, no surprises at all there 🙂
    Also, it makes me very happy to know you don’t have regrets — even though you are 18-ish years ahead of me in this parenting gig! I sometimes wondering if I’ll regret being home a lot, but my kids honestly don’t seem to mind right now and being on a schedule makes our whole family happier!!

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    JoDi Reply:

    I don’t think you’ll regret the time at home at all! When they get older and busier with school activities, having a day at home will be a luxury so it’s nice that you’re getting to enjoy it now. When my son was little, if we had hectic weeks with lots of things we had to go out and do, he would always ask me when we were going to have a day when we didn’t have to go anywhere. I think most kids really enjoy being home if they have a variety of things to do like your kids do. My husband is the same way. We both work full-time and are both happy to hang out at home doing yardwork or projects on the weekend. We go out to do fun stuff too, but we love our home time! We are all INTJ.

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  23. Denise

    04/27/2017

    I totally agree with you! I am a mom to 16 month old twins and we don’t go out very often! Home is a great place, with all the things we need and we have lots of family come for a visit!

    [Reply]

    Andrea Reply:

    oh wow — 16 month twins. I’d be home too!!

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