Fool-Proof Hard ‘Boiled’ Eggs… in the Oven!

posted by Andrea | 03/18/2015
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fool-proof hard boiled eggs

I’ve always been a HUGE fan of eggs — almost any type of eggs. In general, I guess our family loves most breakfast foods, which is why we have breakfast for dinner about once a week.

In addition to my love of eggs and breakfast foods, I eat a MASSIVE amount of hard boiled eggs — like sometimes more than one per day! Since I love eggs, hard boiled eggs seem to be the perfect snack choice when I’m rushed. They require no prep-work (except peeling them) they are healthy, protein-packed, low/no sugar, and they can easily be prepared ahead of time and stored in the fridge for several days.

Dave does not share my love for hard boiled eggs, but he’s fine if I eat them when he’s not in the room 🙂

For years, I actually boiled my hard boiled eggs… until I came across this post from my blogging friend Tara of Unsophisticook (and Deal Seeking Mom). She BAKED her hard ‘boiled’ eggs in the oven and they came out perfectly every single time!

I can remember the day I read that post over 2 years ago, I immediately grabbed my mini muffin tin and a handful of eggs to give it a try. To my amazement, it worked marvelously — and I’ve been baking my hard boiled eggs ever since.

So with Easter right around the corner and more people looking to hard boil eggs, I thought it would be a perfect time to share this SUPER SIMPLE recipe on my blog — since I’ve been using it for over 2 years now!

Recipe for Hard ‘Boiled’ Eggs in the Oven

{print recipe}

INGREDIENTS:

  • eggs (I usually do a dozen at a time — but any number should work)
  • mini muffin tin
  • ice water

DIRECTIONS:

  • preheat oven to 325*F
  • place eggs in mini muffin tin cups
  • bake in preheated oven for 30 minutes
  • while eggs bake, fill a large bowl with ice and cold water
  • when the eggs are finished, remove them from the oven immediately and quickly transfer them into the ice water (you’ll want to use tongs or an Ove Glove
  • Let the eggs sit in ice water for at least 10 minutes
  • Put eggs back into carton and label the carton (or the individual eggs) so you know which ones are hard boiled

A Few Helpful Tips:

1. Don’t try to bake anything else in the oven with the eggs as then the 30-minute time frame won’t be accurate (even if you’re using a convection oven — I know from experience!) so you’ll be left guessing how long to leave them in. I can almost guarantee that you’ll end up under or over-cooking them so it’s just not worth it in my opinion!

2. Use eggs that are at least 1-2 weeks “old” as they will be MUCH easier to peel (I promise!) I usually buy a couple dozen eggs each week and save one dozen for hard boiled eggs. I actually write “for hard boiled” on the carton, and then keep them in the back of the fridge for at least a week. Once I boil them, I put them back in that carton and cross out the “for” so it just says “hard boiled”.

3. The egg shells will usually have brown spots all over them when they come out of the oven — this is normal and nothing to be concerned about. The spots usually wash right off in the ice bath, but even if they don’t, I wouldn’t worry too much.

4. Hard boiled eggs can last a while in the fridge. I’m not an expert, but I will tell you that even when I let the eggs sit in the fridge for 1-2 weeks after buying them, I have eaten them as hard boiled eggs almost 2 weeks later and am still living to tell you about it 🙂

5. I wouldn’t peel the eggs until you are ready to eat them — you’re entire refrigerator will smell like hard boiled eggs otherwise. Plus, the shells will keep the eggs fresher for longer.

This fool-proof oven-baked method is so simple, I can honestly say that I don’t think I’ll ever actually BOIL a hard boiled egg again!

Oh, and if you’re looking for a really yummy way to use up some of your hard boiled eggs, slice them up and put them on this layered lettuce salad.

How do you cook your hard boiled eggs?

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fool-proof hard boiled eggs

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35 comments

  1. Stacy

    04/11/2015

    Thanks for sharing this method.
    Very helpful.

    [Reply]

  2. Linda

    04/11/2015

    Love this! I did it last week and it worked just like you said. I am doing my second batch today! Thanks Andrea!

    [Reply]

  3. Kathleen Matson

    04/09/2015

    So sad. I followed recipe moor the hard boiled eggs in oven…to a T. Not done.

    [Reply]

    Andrea Reply:

    you’ll probably want to check the temperature of your oven using an oven thermometer. There’s a good chance your oven temp is actually lower than what it’s set at.

    [Reply]

  4. minannb

    04/03/2015

    Definitely easier than the boiling method, but our brown spots didn’t come off in the ice bath, or even when I rubbed them dry. No big deal if you’re just going to peel and eat, but we used them to dye Easter eggs and the brown spots do still show thru the lighter dye colors.

    [Reply]

    Andrea Reply:

    hmmm… that’s weird. I’ve never had any issues with the brown spot not coming off.

    well, not you have polka-dot eggs 🙂

    [Reply]

  5. Julie

    03/24/2015

    Try putting eggs in your rice cooker. Put about a cup of water and salt with it!
    Very delicious!

    [Reply]

    Andrea Reply:

    interesting! There are so many different things you can do with a rice cooker — I should do a post on that!

    [Reply]

  6. Melissa Davis

    03/23/2015

    Hi there – when you say “mini-muffin tin” – what exactly do you mean? I went to go purchase one on Amazon but all the “mini muffin” pans have 24 cups and the regular muffin pans have 12 cups. It looks like the pan in the photo only has 12 cups?

    Is it like this:
    http://www.amazon.com/Wilton-Avanti-Everglide-Metal-Safe-Non-Stick/dp/B000F5K3J8/ref=sr_1_4?s=kitchen&ie=UTF8&qid=1427134698&sr=1-4&keywords=mini+muffin

    or this:
    http://www.amazon.com/Wilton-Avanti-Everglide-Metal-Safe-Non-Stick/dp/B000F5K3J8/ref=sr_1_4?s=kitchen&ie=UTF8&qid=1427134698&sr=1-4&keywords=mini+muffin

    Thanks in advance, I know it seems like an inane question.

    [Reply]

    Andrea Reply:

    Hi Melissa, I’m honestly not sure how to ‘explain’ a mini muffin tin – it’s just like a normal muffin tin… but smaller.
    I have 24-cup mini muffin tins, 12-cup, and 6-cups — any/all will work for the eggs 🙂

    Regular muffing cups would work too — I just use the mini muffin tins because I have them on hand.

    [Reply]

  7. Hannah

    03/22/2015

    I’ve been making “hard boiled eggs” in the oven for about six months now. I tried and failed miserably to actually boil them over and over, and it was a ridiculous mess every single time! I finally googled the easiest way to make hard boiled eggs and found the oven method. So simple, and it works like a charm every time! 🙂

    [Reply]

  8. Elaine

    03/19/2015

    We steam our eggs and I swear by this method. My daughters won’t eat sandwiches, so they have been a go to for protein in their lunches. 2 cups of cold water with a steamer tray on the stove top. Turn the burner on and put a lid on and 17 minutes start to finish. Always perfectly cooked with a yellow yolk. The best part? The peel slides off every time. A MUST for deviled eggs.

    [Reply]

  9. Gabriela

    03/19/2015

    A different way for sure….
    What I wanted to say is that when we went to my in-laws in Peru, the eggs there are not refrigerated. They have them displayed by the cashiers. Also, were sold outside, in pretty hot weather, at a stand. My mother in law keeps them outside and we had eggs almost every morning. Nothing bad happened. So…. I don’t know…..interesting. Now, if I forget the eggs outside for a while I will not worry anymore… 🙂

    [Reply]

    Garnet Reply:

    United States treats eggs differently than any other country. Most other countries don’t need to refrigerate their eggs. Right after the eggs pop out of the chicken, US requires them shampooed and cleaned, which compromises their natural integrity. They’re “clean” but no longer have the natural preserving residue other countries leave alone. That’s why our eggs make us sick while other countries can leave them out just fine.

    [Reply]

    Gabriela Reply:

    Ahhhh…thank you. I actually didn’t even consider doing any research about it. Interesting info. 🙂 thanks again….:)

    [Reply]

    Andrea Reply:

    This is very interesting — thanks for sharing!

    [Reply]

  10. Heart and Haven

    03/18/2015

    Hard boiled eggs are a common staple we have in our house too! I’ve never heard of the “baking” hard boiled eggs method before. However, for the most part I prefer stove top cooking (heats up the house too much here in S. Cali to run the oven often)

    This is the method I use for perfect hard boiled eggs:
    Fill large pot with water, put eggs in water (we usually hard boil 18 at a time), bring water to boil on stove. Once water has boiled turn off the heat and move pot to a cool burner & put iid on for 20 minutes. After the 20 minutes, dump out the hot water and run cool water over eggs in pot for about a minute (until eggs are cool to the touch), then transfer eggs to carton in the fridge.

    The trick I’ve used for easier to peel eggs is to crack the egg a couple of times, then to roll it around on a hard surface before peeling.

    [Reply]

  11. Karen S.

    03/18/2015

    I am going to give this a try! We live at about 4500 altitude and boiling eggs is not an easy task. They almost never turn out right no matter which method I use…….don’t even get me started with baking…….sigh

    [Reply]

  12. Nayuleska

    03/18/2015

    Wow, never heard of the oven method. Can I ask how you normally boil eggs and why this way is easier? Is it just easier if you cook a lot? I ask because the way I cook them is far quicker than the oven version and fairly foolproof. I’m relieved to hear they can last 2 weeks as I thought they would go off after 5 days or so, so always hurried to eat them!

    I put mine in a saucepan, fill it with boiling water until it covers the eggs. I put the hob on high, #6, wait until it really boils away then turn it down to #4, and aet the oven timer for 10 mins. When it beeps I turn the hob off, tip the water in the sink, add cold water, leave eggs a little while, then take them out, let them cool down then stick them in the fridge.

    [Reply]

  13. Petra

    03/18/2015

    OMG, what an idea! I’ve never heard this idea about making it in the oven… I must try it soon.
    My husband loves egg stew which needs quite a lot of eggs 🙂

    [Reply]

  14. susie

    03/18/2015

    Eggs are so good for you too when you are pregnant and nursing. That’s when I crave them the most.

    [Reply]

  15. Chris

    03/18/2015

    I guess I’ll have to try this again. I found this on Pinterest a year or so ago and tried it. It made my kitchen stink and they got burned. 🙁

    [Reply]

    Andrea Reply:

    yes, you’ll definitely need to try it again — and maybe this time, use an oven thermometer to test the temperature of your oven first. You’d be surprised how much oven temps can vary!

    [Reply]

    Chris Reply:

    Thanks!

    [Reply]

  16. lydia @ frugaldebtfreelife

    03/18/2015

    Tip: If you want to do this with fresh eggs leave them on the counter til they reach room temperature. They will be very easy to peel.

    I too LOVE hardboiled eggs. It’s pretty much the only way I eat them. We have chickens so we have an endless supply.

    [Reply]

    Andrea Reply:

    wow — thanks for the tip Lydia! I’ll definitely use this the next time I “bake” my hard boiled eggs. I had a ROUGH time peeling some a while back and half the egg whites came off with the shells!

    [Reply]

    Candis Reply:

    You can microwave the egg for 7-10 sec depending on the microwave and it will peel just as easy (tip from my mumsy). I would not recommend microwaving for long as the egg will explode 🙂

    [Reply]

  17. Melissa

    03/18/2015

    I actually own an egg cooker thanks to a well-meaning in-law who gave me one at my bridal shower. It hard boils 7 eggs at a time. Just put the eggs in, add water (from provided measuring cup) and turn it on. It beeps about 20 minutes later – just long enough for me to forget I was making eggs. I probably wouldn’t buy one for myself, but since it was a gift it does get a decent amount of use. This posted reminded me that my 3yo picked all the egg out of a potato salad and I decided to make egg salad for her….

    [Reply]

    Andrea Reply:

    haha — gotta love those random small kitchen appliances:) Glad you’re making use out of your egg cooker!

    [Reply]

  18. Emily

    03/18/2015

    I love this! What a great tip!! I was just thinking the other day that egg salad for lunch sounded delicious but I didn’t want to hassle with boiling eggs. Definitely going to try this out! Now, if we can just get our chickens to start laying again…ready for spring in Michigan!! 🙂

    [Reply]

    Andrea Reply:

    yay for chickens. I always said I wanted to have chickens but then decided it was too much work at this point in my life. Plus, we don’t have a great place to put them right now — and Dave is definitely NOT onboard with my chicken idea… yet 🙂

    [Reply]

    Emily Reply:

    Haha! I never thought we’d have chickens either but weird things happen when you move to the country! 😉 We currently have two chickens and two ducks. They’re pretty low maintinence, but they can be smelly. Maybe when your kiddos are older and can help out with the chicken chores! 🙂

    [Reply]

  19. Jenn S.

    03/18/2015

    Hi Andrea,

    You mentioned that you usually do a dozen at a time, but less should be OK. Given your warning not to bake anything else with the eggs, would you adjust the cook time for fewer eggs?

    Thanks!

    [Reply]

    Andrea Reply:

    It should be fine — as long as your oven temperature is consistent and accurate (you can check with an oven thermometer to make sure).

    I’ve personally don everything from 6 eggs to 24 eggs at a time without issues using this exact recipe.
    Good luck!

    [Reply]

    Jenn S. Reply:

    Perfect – thank you!

    The yolk doesn’t look all crazy either, which is nice – sometimes with boiling they can come out with a weird greyish-greenish tinge if you leave them go too long.

    [Reply]